Things you should never do in Myanmar

06/09/2019   90  4/5 trong 1 rates 
Things you should never do in Myanmar
Most of the norms in Myanmar are heavily influenced by the richness of its ancient history steeped in Buddhism. The following list is a guide to understanding the layers of tradition in the culture as well as its quirkiness. It’s important to remain tolerant and aware of what could be considered insulting to locals, while also discovering the beautiful Myanmar.

 
  • Don’t ride a motorbike in the city center of Yangon

    Don’t ride a motorbike in the city center of YangonDon’t ride a motorbike in the city center of Yangon

    This is actually a law. Motorbikes are supposedly banned in the main parts of Yangon for safety reasons. This may take some getting used to since most other major hubs in the region allow the use of motorized bikes. Motorbikes and electric scooters can be ridden in townships on the outskirts of Yangon as well as in other cities.

  • Don’t pat someone on the head

    Don’t pat someone on the headDon’t pat someone on the head

    The head is considered the highest, holiest part of the human body in Myanmar. This belief is deeply rooted within Buddhist spirituality and has set the scene for a possible cross-cultural blunder to take place. It’s true that travelers are often granted much more grace should a head be accidentally or unknowingly touched, but it could be considered a sign of disrespect to older generations in particular.

  • Don’t let your feet do the pointing

    Don’t let your feet do the pointingDon’t let your feet do the pointing

    Contrary to the head, feet are seen as the lowest, dirtiest part of the body. It’s very rude to point at religious objects, at people, or really at just about anything with your feet in Myanmar – whether that pointing is done unintentionally or not. It’s also thought of as quite rude to point a finger at an image of Buddha, or even in the general direction of a well-known religious site.

  • Don’t wear shoes or socks in sacred spaces

    Don’t wear shoes or socks in sacred spacesDon’t wear shoes or socks in sacred spaces

    It’s of utmost importance to respectfully remove socks and shoes or sandals before entering sacred spaces in Myanmar. Many pagodas even have a place to store footwear for a minimal fee. Ancient, less traversed temples such as several found in Bagan don’t offer the most comfortable or safe terrain to go barefooted upon, so use caution when stepping.

  • Don’t improperly use the image of Buddha

    Don’t improperly use the image of BuddhaDon’t improperly use the image of Buddha

    Portraying the image of Buddha in ways deemed inappropriate in Myanmar may result in severe consequences. A good example of what not to do happened in 2015 when a man from New Zealand was jailed for approximately 10 months. His crime? Using a depiction of Buddha wearing headphones in an advertisement. News of this case made international headlines, and serves as a testament to how serious Myanmar takes religious mockery.

    Images of Buddha in the form of tattoos should be covered (especially if on the lower extremities), prints resembling Buddha on clothing shouldn’t be worn, and posing inappropriately with a statue of Buddha should never, ever seem like a good idea at the time.

Source The Culture Trip

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Nhu Dang

Nhu Dang


is member from: 22/08/2018, has 490 posts

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